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About our reviewer, Maria

We like you to know the person behind the words in these reviews.

Maria Chance
  • Freelance Developmental Editor
  • Book Reviewer & Editor

A self-proclaimed hermit and potential cat hoarder, Maria lives in Virginia where she writes, proofreads and copy edits as a freelancer. Her longstanding love affair with books began when her mother would fall asleep reading bedtime stories to her. (Don't worry; she was sure to wake her up so she could finish.) Now, as an adult, Maria struggles with a reading vice that has often threatened the hygiene of her home. On the few occasions that her nose isn't buried in a book, she enjoys exploring new cities, having margaritas with her sister, and curling up with a book--wait, what?

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Past Reviews

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Helen Hoang Brings Us a Gender-Bent ‘Pretty Woman’ in Her Novel, ‘The Kiss Quotient’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Oct 6th, 2021 8:58 pm

What do you do when your mother keeps nagging you about grandchildren, but your social skills are not the best and you struggle to get involved in a serious relationship? You hire a male escort, of course. At least, that’s how Stella Lang understands it in Helen Hoang’s...

Ali Hazelwood Goes Meta with Fake-Dating Trope in Her Debut, ‘The Love Hypothesis’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Sep 23rd, 2021 4:38 pm

Over and over, and in ways that she could never have anticipated, he had made her feel unjudged. Less alone. — Ali Hazelwood, The Love Hypothesis In Ali Hazelwood’s The Love Hypothesis, all Olive is after, when she abruptly asks Dr. Adam Carlsen in the hallways of Sta...

Jojo Moyes Employs the Art of Misdirection in Heart Wrenching ‘Me Before You’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Mar 12th, 2020 12:41 am

The first time I heard about Jojo Moyes‘ Me Before You was when I saw the trailer for the movie online. It was no more than a thumbnail pic of Emilia Clarke and Sam Claflin that called my attention, but all my fangirl alarms went off. I instantly knew that I was going t...

J.K. Rowling Reveals a Darker Side to her Imagination in ‘The Casual Vacancy’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Mar 13th, 2020 10:02 pm

When J.K. Rowling announced the release of her first adult novel, I told myself to not have any expectations (obviously, there was no doubt in my mind that I would read it). I told myself to keep an open mind, not to expect any wizards or magic. I was certain that I was...

Amy Schumer Bares it All in Hilarious ‘The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Mar 13th, 2020 10:33 pm

What can be said about Amy Schumer that hasn’t already been said? After the release of her first book, The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, not much. She really doesn’t leave much to the imagination, and anything there is to say feels like she’s already said it herself....

Rebecca Serle Tests the Bonds of Friendship in ‘In Five Years’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 9th, 2020 4:17 pm

Right off the bat, I’m going to go ahead and say that Rebecca Serle’s In Five Years is written with a very particular type of reader in mind. That reader, unfortunately, is not me. Victim of my own circumstance for thinking any book with the New York skyline on its cove...

Markus Zusak Highlights the Importance of Rhetoric in ‘The Book Thief’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 19th, 2020 10:52 pm

It didn’t take very much for Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief to take permanent residence at the top of my favorite books. Though the Harry Potter series has been the crowning monarch on that list, after many years, it has opened the door to its palace and allowed The Book...

Elton John Candidly Dazzles with One and Only Autobiography, ‘Me’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 30th, 2020 7:33 pm

Few artists can boast a repertoire quite like Sir Elton John’s, one that fills his prolific autobiography from cover to cover, one that would leave hardly any room for breath if it were verbally narrated. Me is replete with anecdotes spanning a career that started with...

Margarita Montimore’s ‘Oona Out of Order’ Brilliantly Reflects on What It Means to Let Life Unfold
Reviewed By Maria Chance Sep 29th, 2020 4:11 am

But there was a freedom in making mistakes, feeling broken, falling into the void, and then climbing out. A freedom in letting go, setting aside, moving on.” — Margarita Montimore, Oona Out of Order Margarita Montimore’s Oona Out of Order is not your typical time trav...

Jedidiah Jenkins Bikes from Oregon to Patagonia in Search for Answers in ‘To Shake the Sleeping Self’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Oct 4th, 2020 7:22 pm

If discontent is your disease, travel is medicine. -- Jedidiah Jenkins Struck by the proverbial quarter-life crisis, Jedidiah Jenkins sets off on a journey from Oregon to Patagonia to find … something – he’s not quite sure what, he just knows he needs to go find it. A...

Lori Gottlieb Documents Her Experience as Both Therapist and Patient
Reviewed By Maria Chance Oct 28th, 2020 10:35 pm

It’s impossible to get to know people deeply and not come to like them. -- Lori Gottlieb Not since reading Harry Potter, in my younger years, has a book made me simultaneously want to keep reading while also not wanting it to end. Still, in about three days, I managed...

Taylor Jenkins Reid’s ‘The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo’ is a Model of Literary Inclusivity
Reviewed By Maria Chance Dec 19th, 2020 2:00 am

People think that intimacy is about sex. But intimacy is about truth. When you realize you can tell someone your truth, when you can show yourself to them, when you stand in front of them bare and their response is ‘you’re safe with me’- that’s intimacy. — Taylor Jenki...

Sally Rooney Nuances Human Connection and Relationships in ‘Normal People’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Dec 20th, 2020 6:52 pm

Most people go through their whole lives, without ever really feeling that close with anyone. — Sally Rooney In Sally Rooney’s Normal People we enter a plane in which the two main characters nor anything that happens to them is extraordinary, and yet they experience t...

Kate Elizabeth Russell’s ‘My Dark Vanessa’ Delves Into the Deeper Truth of Abuse Victims
Reviewed By Maria Chance Apr 28th, 2021 9:52 pm

Kate Elizabeth Russell does away with taboo in her debut, My Dark Vanessa. Many will likely label it “controversial.” But there are many reasons why everyone should read Russell’s novel depicting child abuse and pedophilia. When My Dark Vanessa begins, the year is 2017...

Laura Zigman’s Separation Anxiety Explores Unconventional Coping Mechanisms
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 13th, 2021 7:54 pm

Some children grow stronger in the broken places, like bones; others grow sadder. I did both. — Laura Zigman, Separation Anxiety When we begin Laura Zigman’s latest novel, Judy’s life is falling apart. She’s is 50 years old and living with her husband, Gary, even thou...

Andie J. Christopher’s ‘Hot Under His Collar’ Will Have You Eagerly Booking a One-way Trip to Hell in First Class
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 31st, 2021 8:57 pm

He hated himself for how she pulled his intention. For years, everything had been tugged in the direction of God and duty and church. Now, it was only Sasha. He worshipped at the altar of the dimple in her left cheek, prayed novenas to the curve of her mouth. Her angel...

Review of Songs in Ursa Major
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 21st, 2021 12:39 am

Jane was no longer aware of what her hands were doing, but somehow they kept playing. The song filled the room like water, suspending them, weightless, as they watched each other. Jane knew the moment the music ended, gravity would return.” — Emma Brodie, Songs in Ursa...

A Professional Drama Queen Goes in Search for Her Mother in Emma Lord's 'When You Get the Chance'
Reviewed By Maria Chance Dec 30th, 2021 12:37 am

In Emma Lord’s When You Get the Chance, Millie Price just got into a prestigious pre-college that will help her achieve her dreams of becoming a Broadway star. However, her father is refusing to let her go. So what does a kid do when one parent says no? They go ask the...

Alexandra Christo’s ‘To Kill a Kingdom’ Restores ‘The Little Mermaid’ To Its Dark Origins
Reviewed By Maria Chance Apr 28th, 2022 10:22 pm

Alexandra Christo taps into the darkness of Hans Christian Andersen’s classic ‘The Little Mermaid’ in her own retelling, ‘To Kill a Kingdom.’ If there’s one thing a Little Mermaid fans know, it’s that the writers behind Disney’s script took many creative liberties with...

Experience the Exotic and the Supernatural in Alice C. Early’s Debut, ‘The Moon Always Rising’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Apr 28th, 2022 10:30 pm

Alice C. Early takes us into the very heart of the Caribbean with her spring debut, The Moon Always Rising. Her protagonist, Eleanor “Els” Gordon has taken a beating emotionally and professionally. After the loss of her fiancé, her beloved nanny, her beloved father and...

Ariella Elovic’s ‘Cheeky: A Head-to-Toe Memoir’ Will Inspire Women to See Their Bodies in a Different Light
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 9th, 2022 12:29 am

Ariella Elovic is an artist, blogger and now, with the publication of her debut, Cheeky: A Head-to-Toe Memoir, she can add author to her resume. At the base of her journey of achievements rests her determination to love her body in a way few women have ever done before....

Andrew David MacDonald’s ‘When We Were Vikings’ Nuances the Blurred Lines Between Villains and Heroes
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 14th, 2022 1:50 am

In Andrew David MacDonald’s When We Were Vikings, we step inside the mind of Zelda, a 21-year-old woman struggling to gain independence, especially from her older brother, Gert. Most older brothers are overprotective, but Zelda is a slightly different case as her mother...

Brigid Kemmerer Tactfully Expands on a Beloved Classic With ‘A Curse So Dark and Lonely’
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 14th, 2022 1:56 am

Retellings of classic stories can sometimes go painfully wrong. Sometimes, the readers who hold some of these classic stories to heart would prefer writers to leave them intact, or in what we consider to be their already perfect form. Fortunately, once in a while, a wri...

A Century-Long, Chicken-Fueled Family Feud Takes Center Stage in KJ Dell’Antonia’s ‘The Chicken Sisters’
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 14th, 2022 2:03 am

For more than a century the Moore and the Pogociello families have been at war. A chicken war. Chicken Mimi’s and Chicken Frannie’s are two similar fried chicken eateries set up by sisters in the late 19th century in the small town of Merinac, Kansas. In KJ Dell’Antonia...

Melissa Broder Explores the Forbidden Joy of Indulgence in Her Latest Novel, ‘Milk Fed’
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 14th, 2022 2:33 am

When we first meet Rachel in Melissa Broder’s Milk Fed, she’s counting calories with fussy meticulosity. She follows a strict food regimen to maintain what she considers her perfect weight and perfect look. If she goes over her allotted calorie count, she’ll have to run...

‘Wildflower Season’ Sets the Stage for Michelle Major’s Spin-Off of Her ‘Magnolia Sisters’ Series
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 14th, 2022 2:15 am

In Michelle Major’s Wildflower Season, a spin-off of her Magnolia Sisters series, Emma Cantrell lands in Magnolia, North Carolina hoping for a fresh start after a nasty divorce and hoping to cut the strings attached to her overbearing mother. She buys an old mansion tha...

Vanessa Riley’s ‘Island Queen’ Is the Powerful, Fictional Retelling of the Life of Dorothy Thomas
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 14th, 2022 2:27 am

There are queens born and there are queens made. In Island Queen, Vanessa Riley tells the story of a real-life, self-made queen of the highest order: Dorothy Kirwan Thomas. Born into slavery, the daughter of a slave and a plantation owner, Dorothy was barely five years...

Alison McGhee’s ‘The Opposite of Fate’ Plunges Fearlessly Into the Core of the Pro-Choice vs Pro-Life Debate
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 24th, 2022 9:52 pm

It’s a question that’s been asked since the debate for and against abortion came into existence: Would you give birth to your rapist’s baby? This is the exact inquiry Alison McGhee raises in her latest novel, The Opposite of Fate. However, McGhee shifts her scenario wit...

Becky Mandelbaum Uplifts and Brings Comfort in ‘The Bright Side Sanctuary for Animals’
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 24th, 2022 9:56 pm

In Becky Mandelbaum’s The Bright Side Sanctuary for Animals, we’re introduced to Mona who runs The Bright Side, an animal sanctuary that’s seen better days, and her daughter Ariel, who, wanting more than just a farm life, ran away from it all six years ago, moving from...

Elizabeth Gilbert’s ‘City of Girls’ Explores One Woman’s Journey from Shame to Self-Love
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 24th, 2022 10:11 pm

In City of Girls, Elizabeth Gilbert takes us back to the year 1940, introducing us to Vivian Morris, a girl whom most judgmental minds would find easy to label an airhead and a tramp. Vivian starts out with very little direction in her life. At the age of 19 she’s been...

Mona Awad’s ‘All’s Well,’ A Satirical Take On the Frustrating Invisibility of Female Pain
Reviewed By Maria Chance May 24th, 2022 10:13 pm

Miranda is a drama professor attempting to direct a production of All’s Well That Ends Well in Mona Awad’s latest novel, All’s Well. An acting instructor whose own acting career was cut short by a crippling fall from a stage, Miranda lives stewing in bitterness. She’s i...

Unravel A Mystery Disguised as a Love Story in Beatriz Williams, Lauren Willig and Karen White’s ‘All the Ways We Said Goodbye’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 2:01 pm

In All The Ways We Said Goodbye, Beatriz Williams, Lauren Willig and Karen White team up to bring us an epic tale of three women connected through time, love, heartbreak and war with the Ritz Paris as their silent witness. We meet the three main characters of this novel...

Caitlin Mullen’s ‘Please See Us’ Begs Us to Witness the Harsh Realities of Gender Inequality
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 3:11 pm

Caitlin Mullen’s Please See Us paints a grim image of the struggles of Atlantic City, especially after Hurricane Sandy. In her new novel, she focuses particularly on the struggle of women trying to make a living within it. Clara is a 16-year-old, high-school-drop out. S...

Andrea Davis Pinkney Delivers a Story of Generational Perseverance Against Racism in ‘Loretta Little Looks Back’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 2:17 pm

In Andrea Davis Pinkney’s Loretta Little Looks Back, illustrated by her husband, Brian Pinkney, we are invited to hear the story of three generations in the traditional monologue “go tell it” style, beginning in 1927, Mississipi, with Loretta, who’s lovingly called ‘Ret...

Cambria Gordon’s ‘The Poetry of Secrets’ Explores the Terrors of the Spanish Inquisition Through the Lens of Star-Crossed Lovers
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 2:20 pm

When we begin Cambria Gordon’s The Poetry of Secrets, the year is 1481, and Isabel is the oldest daughter of the Perez family, which consists of her two parents, grandmother and her sister, Beatriz. They reside in Trujillo, Spain where they’re known as conversos, meanin...

Charlie N. Holmberg Explores the Link Between Having a Soul and Being Human in ‘The Will and the Wilds’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 2:24 pm

What is a body without a soul? In The Will and the Wilds, Charlie N. Holmberg attempts to answer that question by means of a fantasy-filled tale. She introduces us to Enna, a young woman residing in the small village of Fendell with her father whom she looks after. Unfo...

Douglas A. Martin’s ‘Branwell’ Casts the Spotlight on the Infamous Brontё Brother
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 2:28 pm

In Branwell: A Novel of the Brontё Brother, Douglas A. Martin zeros in on the life of Patrick Branwell Brontё, the infamous brother of the acclaimed, world-renown authors Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontё. Readers familiar with the Brontё family history will most likely...

Josh MacPhee’s Collection of Posters in ‘Celebrate People’s History’ is a Beguiling and Inspiring Look at Humanity’s Long Journey of Activism
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 2:35 pm

There’s a reason the old adage has always been “A picture says a thousand words.” The right words will always reach and touch people, but there’s a distinctive rush of power that accompanies the visual interpretation of a fight. This is what Josh MacPhee had in mind whe...

Mike DeCapite’s ‘Jacket Weather’ Redefines Narrative Styles in an Unconventional Way
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 8th, 2022 2:39 pm

Mike DeCapite’s Jacket Weather begins one day in NYC when Mike runs into his old flame, June. Twice divorced and looking to start life over again, June doesn’t want to become seriously involved with Mike but pursues the friendship nonetheless. A few dates in and June an...

‘Normal People’ TV Mini Series Review: Sally Rooney’s Novel About Human Connection Stuns on the Small-Screen as it Does on Paper
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 9th, 2022 12:49 am

If I had no idea who Sally Rooney was and you told me that she’s published two best-selling novels and can now add an adapted series to her resume, I’m not gonna lie, I’d be salty AF. If you added that she’s not even thirty yet, I might actually slap you and tell you to...

Kikuko Tsumura Nuances the Millennial Pursuit for Purposeful Work in ‘There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 9th, 2022 12:23 am

There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job, Kikuko Tsumura’s latest novel, translated by Polly Barton, follows a nameless protagonist, who, in the wake of burnout from a job she’s worked at for 14 years, decides to quit. Her new mission is to find a job that “requires no read...

A Series of Unfortunate Meet Cutes Provides Nine Quickies to Satisfy Romance Lovers' Needs
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jun 23rd, 2022 2:08 pm

A Series of Unfortunate Meet Cutes is an anthology made up of nine steamy, novella-length, romance stories. As the title implies, the theme that ties these nine stories together is a meet-cute between a man and a woman laden with awkwardness and sometimes eliciting seco...

Andie J. Christopher's Latest Novel, 'Thank You, Next,' Balances Introspection and Self-Work with Humor and Lightheartedness
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 11th, 2022 2:07 pm

Alex Turner is single and happy...ish. She’s a bad-ass divorce attorney who doesn’t need a relationship to define her. She’s a self-made woman, with an awesome support group. She knows what she wants and when that doesn’t please her anymore, she has no qualms about walk...

CJ Hauser’s ‘Family of Origin’ Explores Our Endless, Human Quest for Happiness
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 2:28 am

CJ Hauser’s Family of Origin revolves around Nolan and Elsa Grey, two siblings who head off to Leap’s Island after learning their father, Ian Grey, has drowned in the surrounding waters. Leap’s Island is a tiny island in the Gulf of Mexico that can only be reached by ri...

Clare McHugh Recreates a Relatable Royal Family in ‘A Most English Princess’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 2:35 am

Queen Victoria’s daughter takes center stage in Clare McHugh’s slice of history, A Most English Princess. Beginning with her childhood and leading us to her last days, we are given a front-row invitation to witness the life of the young Princess Royal, addressed through...

Eshkol Nevo’s ‘The Last Interview’ Explores One Writer’s Maneuvering of the Blurred Lines Between Truth and Fiction
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 2:41 am

The Last Interview, translated from Hebrew by Sondra Silverston, is Eshkol Nevo’s new novel where the main character, a popular Israeli writer, answers questions sent to him by a website editor. Printed in a fitting question/answer format, the questions mostly encompass...

Inès Bayard’s ‘This Little Family’ Depicts One Woman’s Harrowing Descent Into Madness
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 2:53 am

Inès Bayard holds absolutely nothing back in her debut, This Little Family, translated from French by Adriana Hunter. I can say with confidence that, to date, this is the darkest book I have ever read, and I’ve read my share of dark stories. From the very beginning, we...

Through a Filter of Dark Humor, Emily Austin Delves Into the Depths of an Anxious Mind in ‘Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 2:58 am

In Emily Austin’s Everyone in This Room Will Someday be Dead, Gilda thinks about death. Every. Single. Instant. Of. Every. Single. Day. And it’s starting to wear on her. Whether she’s at the store, at home, watching a movie with her girlfriend, or celebrating a friend’s...

Connie Palmen Plays Devil’s Advocate by Invoking Ted Hughes’ Voice in ‘Your Story, My Story’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 3:07 am

It’s been a few years since I fell into a Sylvia Plath-themed rabbit hole, but ever since, I’ve been mystified by everything having to do with the poet. Whether or not you’re intimately acquainted with her craft or her life story, it’s still pretty well-known that her u...

Courtney Cook Bravely Punctures Society’s Preconceived Notions of Life with BPD in her Graphic Memoir, ‘The Way She Feels’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 3:16 am

In The Way She Feels, Courtney Cook shares her greatest vulnerabilities about living with borderline personality disorder. A mental illness that’s not well-understood and difficult to diagnose before the age of 18, Cook realizes how very little awareness there is out th...

Tishani Doshi’s ‘Small Days and Nights’ is an Existential Exploration of What it Means to be a Progressive Woman in a Man’s World
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 3:20 am

Can a woman still find fulfillment in life as she approaches middle age, unmarried and childless while living in a country where family, marriage and procreation are held at high standards? This is the question Tishani Doshi sets out to answer in Small Days and Nights....

John Kenney Explores the Ascent of Cancel Culture and Sensationalist Media in His Latest Novel, ‘Talk to Me’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 3:24 am

We’ve seen it time and time again, especially in recent years, parallel to the increasing popularity of social media: the tragic descent of some of our favorite and most trusted celebrities as they fall prey to cancel culture. All it takes is one small slip-up, and sudd...

‘I Thought You Said This Would Work’ is Ann Garvin’s Comical and Perceptive Exploration of the Dynamics of Friendships
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 3:29 am

When we first enter Ann Garvin’s I Thought You Said This Would Work, Samantha Arias’ best friend, Katie, is at the hospital getting blood work done, and it’s not looking good. Without missing a beat, Samantha runs to her friend’s side, but when she arrives there she has...

Rebecca Watson’s Debut, ‘Little Scratch,’ Dismantles All Preconceived Ideas of Literature
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 10th, 2022 3:35 am

When I first opened my copy of Rebecca Watson’s summer debut, Little Scratch, at first glance, I thought there must be a misprint. Upon closer inspection, however, I realized this book was very different from any I’d ever read before. The narrative is deconstructed in s...

Michael Elias Explores the World from a Woman’s Perspective in New Novel, ‘You Can Go Home Now’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 14th, 2022 4:49 pm

Michael Elias’ You Can Go Home Now pulls you in with the premise of a detective who is seeking justice as she goes undercover at the Artemis Women’s Shelter. She’s investigating the death of men who have been linked to women who’ve passed through this shelter. However,...

Shelley Blanton-Stroud’s Debut, ‘Copy Boy,’ Is Both Outrageous and Inspiring
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 14th, 2022 4:54 pm

Shelley Blanton-Stroud’s debut, Copy Boy stirs images of old Film Noir mysteries. Though its plot moves like a classic mystery thriller, we soon come to see all the deeper themes coursing through its pages. We first meet Jane Hopper in the 1930s depression era. She and...

Louise Fein Explores WWII from a Nazi Perspective in ‘Daughter of the Reich’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 14th, 2022 4:59 pm

In Daughter of the Reich, Louise Fein delves into the difficult task of bringing a character to life who wholeheartedly follows Hitler’s anti-Semitic, fascist movement. When we first meet Hetty the year is 1929, and she’s an eight-year-old child. One day, while hanging...

With Her Moving Memoir ‘Love Is An Ex-Country,’ Randa Jarrar Overcomes Oppression In Its Many Forms
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 14th, 2022 5:04 pm

In Love Is An Ex-Country, Randa Jarrar takes us along on a journey as she shows us glimpses of her life. Born in the United States to refugee, Palestinian parents, Jarrar faced racism in one of the oddest ways: because she is white-passing, white people try involving he...

Marie-Helene Bertino Steps Into a Surrealist Warp In New Novel ‘Parakeet’
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 14th, 2022 5:09 pm

Marie-Helene Bertino’s Parakeet is a vortex of symbolism and metaphors. Through the main character known solely as The Bride, we are taken into a world that is very much like our own but one that teeters into surrealism. When we first encounter The Bride, she’s engaging...

Susan Choi’s Award-Winning ‘Trust Exercise’ Incites the Perils of Adolescence in a Society Struggling with Authenticity
Reviewed By Maria Chance Jul 14th, 2022 5:17 pm

Adolescence is one of the most complicated stages of life. That formative period when you’re not quite a child and not quite an adult can be confusing as well as painful. In National Book Award for Fiction winner, Trust Exercise, Susan Choi deftly navigates the turbulen...

S.K Ali's 'Love from Mecca to Medina' is a Model for Writing Culture Unapologetically
Reviewed By Maria Chance Oct 25th, 2022 2:43 pm

In S.K. Ali’s Love from Mecca to Medina, the sequel to Love from A to Z, readers are reunited with Adam and Zayneb, a young Muslim couple navigating the turbulent waters of long-distance love. Despite the distance between them, their bond remains strong. However, as Zay...